Grand Larson

Posted By Mena Ganey on Feb 10, 2016 | 0 comments


Grand Larson is totally based on Gary Larson’s, The Far Side. I’m a fan. I think most people are. Larson’s comic was mass-produced for democratic consumption, and his gift was the amazingly brilliant and simple way he illuminated the terror of being alive. Larson did something that in my mind is genius. He touched on universality, communicating to those who could send rockets into space, and those who shouldn’t unite fireworks and flame, (for their own safety).

Most Far Side strips have captions. After painting several, I began to understand why. People thought I was painting in the manner of surrealism…and I wasn’t. I was trying to capture humor. These paintings are my scientific exploration of humor as physical objects. Observation: without a title, or verbal clues, these images take on a surreal quality. How terrible to come home and find your house wrecked – but it’s funny if you read, “Well no wonder. Look who was out the whole evening!?” and you see a tiny bird with the cage door open.
Language is the clue, or glue, to communicating experience, which humor is based on. Think I’m wrong? Try watching South Park in a foreign language. Things that are funny index your memories. Annexing experience and contrasting it with personal observation. Humor could be observed as form following function, which unites us briefly in the observed moment. These paintings illustrate humor lies in a common thread, it is the expectation of unhappiness, pain, stupidity, and just the Murphy’s Law waiting around the corner. Each painting is a compression of circumstance, which illustrates intense situations and the need for an explanation. Visual proof that it’s hard to make a visual punch line. Pun intended.

Let go, Morty! You're Pulling me In . Let go Morty!!! Let Go. You're Pulling Me In."

“Let go Morty! You’re pulling me in. Let go morty! Let go. You’re pulling me in”
16 in x 16 in
acrylic on canvas
2012

24 in x 36 in oil on canvas

“Well no wonder. Look who was out the whole evening!?”
24 in x 36 in
oil on canvas
2012

You call that mowin' the lawn? … Bad dog! … No biscuit! … Bad Dog!

“You call that mowin’ the lawn? … Bad dog! … No biscuit! … Bad Dog!”
20 in x 20 in
acrylic on canvas
2012

You all are my witnesses! He laughed when my marshmallow caught fire.

“You all are my witnesses! He laughed when my marshmallow caught fire.”
20 in x 20 in
oil on linen
2011

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